By NICHOLAS BAKALAR

Author's details

Name: By NICHOLAS BAKALAR
Date registered: July 23, 2012
URL: http://www.nytimes.com/pages/health/views/index.html?partner=rss&emc=rss

Latest posts

  1. Well: Positive Science on ART Babies — January 29, 2015
  2. Well: Expensive Drugs Work Better Than Cheap Ones — January 28, 2015
  3. Well: Sugary Drinks Tied to Earlier Menstruation — January 27, 2015
  4. Well: High Cholesterol Takes Its Toll Over Time — January 26, 2015
  5. Well: Salt May Not Affect Heart Risks — January 26, 2015

Author's posts listings

Well: Positive Science on ART Babies

The healthy outcomes of babies born through assisted reproduction technology, or fertility treatments, are rising, a large study shows.

Well: Expensive Drugs Work Better Than Cheap Ones

In Parkinson’s patients, an “expensive” placebo worked significantly better, producing a two-fold improvement compared with the “cheap” one.



Well: Sugary Drinks Tied to Earlier Menstruation

A new study has found that the consumption of sugary drinks is associated with lowered age of the first menstrual period.

Well: High Cholesterol Takes Its Toll Over Time

Researchers found that the longer cholesterol remained, elevated the greater the likelihood for cardiovascular disease.

Well: Salt May Not Affect Heart Risks

A new study suggests that dietary salt may have little or no effect on the risk for heart disease in older adults.

Well: Coffee May Cut Melanoma Risk

Drinking coffee is associated with a slightly reduced risk for skin cancer, a new study has found.

Well: A Drink a Day to Lower Heart Failure Risk

A daily cocktail may be associated with a lower risk for heart failure.

Well: How Vitamin D May Fight Colon Cancer

Vitamin D may interact with the immune system to prevent the growth of colorectal malignancies.

Well: Blueberries May Lower Blood Pressure

A cup a day of blueberries lowered blood pressure in older women with hypertension.

Well: Many Who Take a Daily Aspirin Don’t Need It

Many healthy people take a daily aspirin to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, but a new study has found that more than 11 percent of them should not be doing so.

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