By NICHOLAS BAKALAR

Author's details

Name: By NICHOLAS BAKALAR
Date registered: July 23, 2012
URL: http://www.nytimes.com/pages/health/views/index.html?partner=rss&emc=rss

Latest posts

  1. Well: Sense of Smell May Predict Longevity — October 1, 2014
  2. Well: Hospital Infections With C. Difficile Level Off — October 1, 2014
  3. Well: Working Long Hours Tied to Diabetes Risk — September 30, 2014
  4. Well: Teenagers and Weight Loss — September 25, 2014
  5. Well: Ultrasound vs. CT for Kidney Stones — September 24, 2014

Author's posts listings

Well: Sense of Smell May Predict Longevity

A defective sense of smell appears to be a good predictor of whether you’ll die in the next five years, a new study has found.



Well: Hospital Infections With C. Difficile Level Off

The incidence of the potentially deadly bacterial infection known as Clostridium difficile has leveled off in recent years.

Well: Working Long Hours Tied to Diabetes Risk

Working long hours may increase the risk for Type 2 diabetes, a new review has found, but the risk is only apparent in workers of lower socioeconomic status.

Well: Teenagers and Weight Loss

Teenagers trying to lose weight should engage in an exercise program that includes both aerobic and resistance training, a randomized trial has found. It also found that diet without exercise accomplishes little.

Well: Ultrasound vs. CT for Kidney Stones

For the initial diagnosis of kidney stones, ultrasounds may be a better choice than CT scans, a new study has found.

Well: Vitamin E, Selenium Fail to Prevent Cataracts

Vitamin E and selenium are unlikely to lower cataract risk, though selenium might have a small effect, a large new study found.

Well: A Better Baby I.C.U.

By many measures, a neonatal intensive care unit with single-family rooms produces better results than one with a shared, open-bay arrangement, a new study found.

Well: The Expanding American Waistline

Average waist circumference — but not B.M.I. — has increased significantly in the United States, a new study reports.



Well: Select Drugs Cause Most Childhood Poisonings

Twelve active ingredients were involved in almost half of hospitalizations of children for prescription drug poisoning, a new study found.

Well: HPV Vaccine Program in Australia Shows Success

The rate of genital warts in young Australian women decreased by 61 percent after the initiation of a program to give free human papillomarivus vaccine.

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