Hans Duvefelt, MD

Author's details

Name: <span itemprop="author">Hans Duvefelt, MD
Date registered: January 13, 2019
URL: https://www.kevinmd.com/blog

Latest posts

  1. When a diagnosis leads to sadness instead of triumph — July 1, 2020
  2. Participating in the greatest miracle a physician is privileged to be part of — June 21, 2020
  3. There’s a code for pain, but what’s the code for suffering? — June 16, 2020
  4. Will telemedicine make us better diagnosticians? — May 28, 2020
  5. It took a pandemic to realize the value of telemedicine — March 24, 2020

Author's posts listings

When a diagnosis leads to sadness instead of triumph

He did a double-take as we passed on our small town sidewalk the other day. “Hey Doc, I didn’t recognize you dressed like that, without your …”, he gestured to where my tie or stethoscope would have been. I was wearing a cafe-au-lait colored T-shirt an…

Participating in the greatest miracle a physician is privileged to be part of

An excerpt from A Country Doctor Writes: CONDITIONS: Diseases and Other Life Circumstances. “Welcome back. How was your trip? Or exile … you were away for a long time.” “Almost a year,” my nine o’clock patient answered. A woman just over forty, s…

There’s a code for pain, but what’s the code for suffering?

Opiates relieve pain and can transport people to their apparent happy place. So does marijuana.  Lyrica, the seizure-turned-pain medication, caused enough of a buzz in early study participants that it became a controlled substance. The anesthetic ketam…

Will telemedicine make us better diagnosticians?

We have all heard that 90 percent of the time, a patient’s history provides the diagnosis before we even perform a physical exam or order any tests. At the same time, much of our reimbursement used to hinge on how many body systems we examined. Like so…

It took a pandemic to realize the value of telemedicine

It took a 125-nanometer virus only a few weeks to move American health care from the twentieth to the twenty-first century. This had nothing to do with science or technology, and only to a small degree was it due to public interest or demand, which had…

How to build trust and therapeutic relationships in 15-minute office visits

It is well known by now that a physician’s demeanor influences the clinical response patients have to any prescribed treatment. We also know that even when nothing is prescribed, a physician’s careful listening, examination, and reassurance about the n…

The most powerful way to provide substance abuse treatment is in a group setting

We knew that the most powerful way to provide substance abuse treatment is in a group setting. Group members can offer support to each other and call out each other’s self-deceptions and public excuses, oftentimes more effectively than the clinicians. …

Physicians are not incentivzed to talk with patients on the phone

Talking to patients on the phone can be very efficient and quite rewarding, like when I called a worried patient today and told her that her chest CT showed an improving pneumonia and almost certainly no cancer, but a repeat scan some months down the r…

When primary care handles the consequences of psychiatric medication prescribing

If my hypertensive patient develops orthostatism and falls and breaks her hip, I fully expect the orthopedic surgeon on call to treat her. I may kick myself that this happened, but I’m not qualified to treat a broken hip. If my anticoagulated patient h…

A physician shares the computer screen with patients

I ran late the other morning. My first patient, an internal transfer, was already waiting. Booting up my laptop seemed to take forever. Usually, I try to poke around at least a little in the EMR before I enter the exam room, even when I know the patien…

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