Category Archive: NEJM

Designing Ethical Trials of Germline Gene Editing

The recent announcement that researchers have successfully used the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) gene-editing technique to correct a mutation that leads to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in human embryos is the latest…

Compelling Reasons for Repairing Human Germlines

Under normal circumstances, if you combined sperm half of which carried a dominant disease allele with unaffected oocytes, only 50% of the resulting human embryos would be expected to have unaffected copies of the gene in question. Researchers Ma, Mita…

Emergency Legal Authority and the Opioid Crisis

Opioid-overdose deaths in the United States have steadily increased for the past 15 years, with more than 33,000 such deaths reported in 2015. The epidemic is unfolding on two fronts: use of prescription opioid pain relievers (OPRs) accounts for approx…

The Quiet Room

At the end of an inconspicuous hallway and strategically placed far from the controlled chaos of the trauma room lies a dimly lit waiting area that we in the medical field call “the quiet room.” It is a bland spot; a few soft chairs surround a table th…

Explaining Sluggish Savings under Accountable Care

Despite aggressive targets set by Medicare for the spread of value-based payment arrangements and widespread agreement on the importance of delivery-system reform, progress toward lower spending growth and a transformed delivery system has been slow. A…

Health Care Professionals and Law Enforcement

Health care professionals generally have a respectful, sometimes even friendly, attitude toward law enforcement. We may feel we’re on the same team as the police when we’re treating victims of crime, and police may be called to protect us from people who seek to harm us in the hospital. Some health…

The Promise, Growth, and Reality of Mobile Health — Another Data-free Zone

The use of mobile communication technologies to improve the health of individuals and populations — dubbed “mobile health,” or “mHealth” — has grown dramatically since 2008, when the term mHealth became widely used. The excitement over the use of mHealth technology especially in low- and…

Primary Care Spending Rate — A Lever for Encouraging Investment in Primary Care

Why doesn’t the United States invest more in primary care? A large body of evidence suggests that greater investment in primary care is good for patients and health systems. Greater use of primary care has been associated with lower costs, higher patient satisfaction, fewer hospitalizations and…

A Renewed Focus on Maternal Health in the United States

Recently, the media have devoted increasing attention to maternal mortality in the United States, as in a ProPublica and National Public Radio article describing the devastating death of a nurse shortly after her first child was born. These reports hav…

Cholera in Yemen — An Old Foe Rearing Its Ugly Head

Yemen, a country with a population of approximately 25 million located at the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, is now experiencing one of the largest cholera outbreaks in recent history. The outbreak, which began in late October 2016 and is repor…

Older posts «

Explore the Archive