Category Archive: Conditions

Looking for the silver lining at supervised injection facilities

The Hippocratic Oath, as presumably most of us know, is the oath taken by physicians promising to uphold ethical standards in treating their patients. The four pillars of medical ethics primarily stem for this oath: autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. The world we see now is socially different compared to what it was when Hippocrates […]

Opioid cheating is a billion-dollar industry

If you search for “how to pass a urine drug test” on the internet, you will get several million results. As physicians, we see and manage the national opioid crisis every day. We see the impacts of this in our practices and our lives. The crisis frankly shows no signs of abating or becoming a […]

Words can hurt those on benzodiazepines

There exists a large, mostly-underground, a growing community consisting of those iatrogenically harmed by benzodiazepines. Guilty only of following doctors orders, these patients are marginalized and misunderstood. This has been enabled, at least in part, by poor terminology. Recently on Twitter, Michael P. Hengartner and Marnie Wedlake both posted critical questions in response to a […]

When men struggle with treatment decisions

It usually starts with a phone call: “Doc, can I come and talk to you about something?” The “something” might be erectile difficulties or other side effect(s) from prostate cancer treatment. It might be confusion or indecision about what treatment to agree to. I always inform the caller that any of these issues are better […]

Remembering the age of polio

“Polio. I’ve seen polio.” Last night, I was speaking with one of the most experienced pediatricians I’ve ever met, Dr. Jack Burstiner. I’ve known him for 50 years. I would have known him even longer if I had been born earlier. He lived in my neighborhood, two doors down. He was my pediatrician. Jack is […]

Remembering the age of polio

“Polio. I’ve seen polio.” Last night, I was speaking with one of the most experienced pediatricians I’ve ever met, Dr. Jack Burstiner. I’ve known him for 50 years. I would have known him even longer if I had been born earlier. He lived in my neighborhood, two doors down. He was my pediatrician. Jack is […]

Behold the power of clinical triads

A few weeks ago, I saw a patient with shortness of breath during my Saturday clinic. He had been short of breath for a few weeks, and on a couple of occasions, he had also experienced mild chest pain. He has known aortic stenosis, moderate according to his last echocardiogram two years ago. My brain […]

10 things a pediatric oncologist wants you to know

1. Cancer is not rare.  Technically, childhood cancer is rare compared to adult cancer, but it’s not as rare as you think.   Outside of my work, I can think of 3 people who I know personally that had a childhood cancer.  A teammate on my high school basketball team, my sister-in-law, and a high school […]

Being a mom doesn’t make you a medical professional

As a mom to two little girls, I understand the lure of online forums. With so many accessible tools — including Google, Instagram, and online support groups like Facebook groups — before a parent brings their child to the doctor, they will inevitably first post their inquiry online. They post a picture: “What’s this rash?” […]

MKSAP: 52-year-old man with severe obstructive sleep apnea

Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 52-year-old man is evaluated in follow-up after being diagnosed with severe obstructive sleep apnea 8 weeks ago. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was prescribed based on a titration during in-laboratory polysomnography. He notes some improvement in his sleep with CPAP, […]

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