Category Archive: study

Children’s Hospitals Are Partly to Blame as Superbugs Increasingly Attack Kids

A growing body of research shows that overuse and misuse of antibiotics in children’s hospitals is helping fuel superbugs, which typically strike frail seniors but are increasingly infecting kids. And the pandemic is making things worse.

Alzheimer’s Inc.: Colleagues Question Scientist’s Pricey Recipe Against Memory Loss

Dr. Dale Bredesen is a well-known, well-respected neurologist. But his colleagues think the comprehensive Alzheimer’s program he’s marketing through a private company is a mixture of free-for-the-asking common sense and unproven interventions.

Feds Look to Pharmacists to Boost Childhood Immunization Rates

Fears over COVID-19 have contributed to a slump in inoculations among children. Now the federal government is looking to pharmacists for help, but many of them do not participate in a program that offers free shots to half the kids in the U.S.

For Nurses Feeling the Strain of the Pandemic, Virus Resurgence Is ‘Paralyzing’

COVID-19’s toll weighs heavily on nurses, who can suffer stress and other psychological problems if they don’t believe they are able to help their patients sufficiently.

‘Breakthrough Finding’ Reveals Why Certain COVID Patients Die

Scientists have found that some people have antibodies against parts of their own immune system, allowing viruses to multiply rapidly.

‘Breakthrough Finding’ Reveals Why Certain COVID Patients Die

Scientists have found that some people have antibodies against parts of their own immune system, allowing viruses to multiply rapidly.

They Work in Several Nursing Homes to Eke Out a Living, Possibly Spreading the Virus

An analysis of location data from 30 million smartphones found that facilities across the country that share the most workers also had the most COVID-19 infections. The “Kevin Bacon of nursing homes” in each state — the one with the most staffers working at other nursing homes — was likely to have the worst outbreaks of coronavirus contagion.

What We Know About the Airborne Spread of the Coronavirus

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has gone back-and-forth on this issue. One thing remains clear: Though science is evolving, indications do point toward the potential for airborne transmission.

Colleges’ Opening Fueled 3,000 COVID Cases a Day, Researchers Say

In a draft study, researchers correlated cellphone data showing students’ back-to-campus movements and county infection rates to quantify how the coronavirus spread as colleges and universities reopened for the fall semester.

Students’ Mass Migration Back to College Gets a Failing Grade

Epidemiologists and disease modelers tried to predict what would happen when students moved back to campus. Although some universities listened to their advice, that didn’t stop outbreaks from happening.

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